A splash of Blue to blanket the Sudanese red blood

Credit:Umit Bekta

A splash of Blue to blanket the Sudanese red blood

On June 03, we witnessed the monumental horror of an emerging dictatorship. The peaceful protest of the Sudanese people was brutally and viciously repressed by the military junta. More than 100 people were killed, excluding rapes and kidnappings.

#Blue for Sudan

The answer in response to this barbaric attitude was the birth of the hashtag #Blue for Sudan. Social media donned blue sheets to support the brave Sudanese.

And yet a few weeks earlier, amidst the fast-food media and the ensuing “follow-others blindly”, we celebrated the dismissal of Omar al-Bashir, which was but ringing the bell of deceit, heralding our naive belief that the troubles of the Sudanese have come to an end. We soon found another piece of ephemral distraction to munch on.

While we were devoting our time and attention to our mundane occupations, the Sudanese — under other conditions, were still vigilant and servaillant. A great depiction of the old saying “That who was bitten by a snake is wary of the caterpillar”. Bashir had indeed been removed from power, but power was not yet in civilian hands, a sine qua non condition for achieving democracy.

Revolution of awareness

An awareness-raising revolution has been set up to bring the military into compliance. The Sudanese people, stood up in unisson against the military and evinced their defiance to the soldiers, who, short of arguments, brutally reprimanded them.

How is it possible to conceal such schizophrenia among the soldiers who massacre a people they claimed to support?

Perhaps the thirst for power? Perhaps we ought to allow the Sudanese a chance to speak out for themselves — and to better assess the big picture?

The Voice of a Sudanese

Mugtaba is 25 years old. He graduated from Sudan University’s Faculty of Science and Technology with honors in Engineering in 2015. Last year, he had to travel to the Arab Emirates after being unable to secure a job in Sudan.

For the first time during a revolution, he was outside his country. Sudan has experienced several resistance movements. Mugtaba was involved in those of 2013 and 2016. Unhappy with his position as a spectator, he became active on social media 24 hours a day to share and spread news. Since the Egyptian revolution, social media have proven to be a significant catalyst for shaking up lines. It is no coincidence that Internet access has been disrupted in Sudan. # internet blackout sudan.

I spotted him thanks to his online dynamism. Without hesitation, he agreed to answer my questions.

Mugtaba’s brother was held in Sudanese jails a few weeks ago before being released.

“The military and Omar al-Bashir are both sides of the same coin. They overthrew him for the sake of power instead of supporting the people.” declared Mugtaba. “We are not fools and we will not let them succeed” he continues.

“We have no desire for Bashir nor his henchmen. The Sudanese people will never compromise their fundamental rights.”

The resilience of the Sudanese people is apparent judging by my discussion with Mugtaba. A people weary of tyranny that neither rape, kidnapping nor murder can stop in their quest for freedom.

“It’s a peaceful revolution… to secure justice”

“It is crucial to emphasize on the peaceful nature of this protest” hammers out Mugtaba Despite the bullying, we will only respond with peace as a sole weapon. “The blood of the Sudanese people has already been spilled enough and we will do everything we can to prevent it from spreading further.”

“If a protester dares to brandish a stone, he/she is sidelined, to guns, we reply with flowers.” continues Mugtaba. Change takes place in non-violence.

In response to the question of what the Sudanese people expect from this revolution, he replies: “Justice, democracy, peace. This is a revolution of awareness. The people no longer want a military regime and want the freedom to shape their own destiny We have not stood up to Omar al-Bashir to stop at this point.”

Supporting the Sudanese revolution

This is such a noble cause that you can only want but to be part of it. However, in what way?

“Everyone can help in their own way by reporting the unfortunate situation, sharing information about the revolution, making people aware of the plight of the Sudanese people” says Mugataba

“We are moved by the support we receive from all over the world. We hope to see this continue. We on our side will not surrender. Even if the world has only one Sudanese left, he will carry the torch of the revolution.” add Mugtaba.

Mugtaba made it clear during the meeting that he was not interested in being allocated any space from the article. I had to insist in order to mention his name. It is not out of fear of retaliation : “between death and losing his soul” his choice is free from ambiguity. Rather lest stealing the spotlight from the revolution as he wants it to be the star of the topic. “I want us to talk about the Revolution, it’s the biggest breakthrough. I can’t simply overshadow it by my presence. It is the revolution and not myself that needs to be the focus of attention.” he concluded.

Sudan, our collective well-being

Our eyes must not drift away from the fate of the Sudanese people.

Setting it free must be a our responsibility. Sudan is our common heritage.

By immersing ourselves in the dense history of this country, we realize first-hand that it should occupy a prominent place in the hearts of all Africans.

Formerly Nubia, this great African country not only because of its vastness but also because of its history, which has sheltered the most glorious part of the black civilization. From its core emanated the greatest kingdoms, Kush, Kerma, Napata, Meroe, a dynasty of black pharaohs like Piye, Taharka and a bloodline of kandaces, the famous warrior queens.

The Meroitic empire was highly evolved with a model of gender equality that would make modern feminists blush in shame. Women had the right to lead on an equal basis with men. In light of this system, great queens like Amanirenas were able to rise. This article alone is unable to cover the rich history of Sudan… This is but a preliminary sketch to demonstrate that Sudan is the cradle of our long-denied civilization… Supporting this country means protecting our heritage.

Contributing to a successful outcome of the revolution by disseminating information is our common duty. The Sudanese people’s blood will not be spilled in vain.

Let us all carry their message!

Together, let us support them!

This is My Sudan, Your Sudan, His Sudan, Her Sudan, Their Sudan, Our Sudan.

#SudanUprisin
#ImTheSudanRevolution
#Watch_sudan_in_30june
#Internet_blackout_in_sudan
#BlueForSudan
#civil_disobedience_in_sudan

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